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Archive for the ‘Interview’ Category

8
May

Interview: Bernard Cornwell

   Posted by: Dan

This week we continue our series on the ‘blog: interviews with speculative fiction authors and illustrators about things that matter to them and to us here in the Wayfarers. Our first interviews (with J.M. Frey and Tim Marquitz and the legendary R.A. Salvatore) were very well received and we’re ecstatic to have bestseller Bernard Cornwell with us today. If you’re new to the site, please take a moment to check out our home page and read what the Quest for the Cure is all about – raising $100,000 for cancer research and support worldwide, by doing a 500-mile trip from Belfast to Edinburgh this October using only medieval gear.

Bernard CornwellKnown best for his Sharpe series, historical writer Bernard Cornwell has been writing for more than thirty years and has produced countless bestsellers. Both his Warlord Chronicles and his Saxon Stories books are set in Medieval Europe and served as a big part of the inspiration for the Wayfarers.

Find him on Amazon, Chapters and Goodreads.

1. In your opinion, is fantasy inherently about the hero’s journey – literal or rhetorical – or about something else? How does this play out in your work?

I honestly have no idea – I mean, it’s fantasy!  And fantasy, surely, is about the imagination loosening its bonds with reality. It can take many forms; inspirational, horror-ridden and everything in between. Inasmuch that most written or filmed fantasy needs the framework of a story then it might be compared to a journey.  How does it play out in my work? Again, I have no idea! Truly. I don’t analyse my work at all. I would say I write earthbound stories and rather shy away from fantasy, but I imagine others would disagree!

2. How does your work involve people, events, or actions that change the world?

Only in passing and by accident. Most of my books are set against a military-historical background and, inevitably, some of them are concerned with world-changing events, but that’s not a sine qua non.  I think they’re about men and women under severe pressure, especially moral pressure.

3. Who inspired you to write? Not your writing style specifically, or characters, setting, etc.; who inspired you to put pen to paper in the first place?

I was a journalist for many years, so I lost the fear of the empty page. Then I fell in love with an American, couldn’t get a Green Card (work permit) so idiotically told her I’d make some money by writing a book. That was it! The inspiration (or necessity). I look back on it and think we must have been crazy (and in love), but it worked. We’ve been married 32 years and I just finished the fiftieth novel.

4. We’ll be walking for four weeks, and our average day is going to see 17 miles of walking done. Motivation has always been a key part of our training. When the going gets tough – in your writing or your life – what do you do to keep going?

Irish whiskey is an enormous help.  Usually there isn’t an alternative except to keep going??  I suppose people could just give-in and give-up, but those people wouldn’t have started the walk in the first place?  Still, a bottle of Jameson might be a great walking companion.

5. Arthur was my hero growing up, and remains so to this day; without my vision of him being tempered by works like your Warlord Chronicles this Quest may never have come to fruition. What do you think Arthur’s place – and the place of the Matter of Britain in general – is in the literary world?

Arthur is a completely malleable hero!  He began, in the Celtic saints’ lives, as a villain.  He became a warlord. Chretien de Troyes, and others, made him into the exemplar of chivalry (and added adultery). Tennyson turned him into a muscular Christian hero. T.H.White invested him with literary magic. Every age writes the Arthur they want and he becomes that. He long lost any touch with reality. He’s the true hero for all ages and I suspect that a thousand years from now they’ll still be writing Arthurian epics in a form we would find unrecognisable, yet inspirational.

24
Apr

Interview: R.A. Salvatore

   Posted by: Dan

This week we continue our series on the ‘blog: interviews with speculative fiction authors and illustrators about things that matter to them and to us here in the Wayfarers. Our first interviews (with J.M. Frey and Tim Marquitz) were well-received and we’re really excited to have the legendary R.A. Salvatore with us this week. If you’re new to the site, please take a moment to check out our home page and read what the Quest for the Cure is all about – raising $100,000 for cancer research and support worldwide, by doing a 500-mile trip from Belfast to Edinburgh this October using only medieval gear.

R.A. Salvatore

R. A. Salvatore

New York Times bestseller R.A. Salvatore needs no introduction for most fantasy readers – his expansive Dark Elf series about the adventures of Drizzt Do’Urden set in the Forgotten Realms world of the official Dungeons and Dragons universe were many peoples’ first looks into high fantasy, and his other works – the DemonWars Saga, the Saga of the First King, and even the novelization of Star Wars: Episode II – have touched millions of readers. You can find his work on Goodreads, Amazon and Chapters-Indigo.

On a personal note, Salvatore’s Dark Elf series contained a scene called the grand melee, where drow students would fight in simulated combat – the last man standing won a prize worth fighting for. This single scene inspired me (and co-Wayfarer Adam) to look into this strange thing called Amtgard more than a decade ago; without our involvement in Amtgard and its greater community this walk never would have happened.

In today’s interview, Salvatore talks about why he wrote his first novel, motivations, and LARPing.

1. In your opinion, is fantasy inherently about the hero’s journey – literal or rhetorical – or about something else? How does this play out in your work? Read the rest of this entry »

17
Apr

Interview: Tim Marquitz

   Posted by: Dan

This week we continue our series on the ‘blog: interviews with speculative fiction authors and illustrators about things that matter to them and to us here in the Wayfarers. Our first interview with J.M. Frey was a hit and we’re excited to have Tim Marquitz with us this week. If you’re new to the site, please take a moment to check out our front page and read what the Quest for the Cure is all about – raising $100,000 for cancer research and support worldwide, by doing a 500-mile trip from Belfast to Edinburgh this October using only medieval gear.

Tim Marquitz

Tim Marquitz
Photo from his website by Rena Mason

Texas-based Tim Marquitz began writing in 1995 and was published a few years later as the dark-fantasy writer his metal-music upbringing would be proud of.

We know Tim through Amtgard, the live-action roleplaying game that he has been playing since he was fifteen years old, 2500 kilometres (1500 miles) away from where we live. He has been instrumental in change throughout the game system and we touch on that, his writing, and his thoughts on motivation in today’s interview.

You can find his books on Goodreads and on Amazon and Chapters-Indigo, and learn more at his website.

1. How does your work involve people, events, or actions that change the world? Read the rest of this entry »

10
Apr

Interview: J.M. Frey

   Posted by: Dan Tags: , , , ,

This week we are starting an exciting new series on the ‘blog: interviews with speculative fiction authors and illustrators about things that matter to them and to us here in the Wayfarers. If you’re new to the site, please take a moment to check out our front page and read what the Quest for the Cure is all about – raising $100,000 for cancer research and support worldwide, by doing a 500-mile trip from Belfast to Edinburgh this October using only medieval gear.

JM Frey, our first interviewee

J.M. Frey
Photo from her website by Jim Tinios

Toronto-based J.M. Frey (pronounced “fry”) is a sci-fi and fantasy author, receiving a number of awards for her short-form work in novellas and short stories; she has also been a guest panelist on Space!channel and is an avid cosplayer – so she understands about our costumes! Her debut novel, TRIPTYCH, is available at Chapters and Amazon, and you can check her out on the web at her website (jmfrey.net) and on Twitter (@scifrey). She is also one of those awesome authors who frequents literary social media site Goodreads.

We would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to Ms Frey for responding to our email with such enthusiasm. Our Quest would not be possible without the support of outstanding people like you!

Let’s jump right in:

1. How does your work involve people, events, or actions that change the world? Read the rest of this entry »